A closer look at Elderberry. The history, cultivation, growing, production, nutrition facts, health benefits, uses and applications. Elderberry juice concentrate and elderberry powder.

A closer look at Elderberry. The history, cultivation, growing, production, nutrition facts, health benefits, uses and applications. Elderberry juice concentrate and elderberry powder.

Elderberries

Elderberries are the fruit of the Sambucus tree. The most common type is the Sambucus nigra. The various species are commonly called elder or elderberry. The genus was formerly placed in the honeysuckle family, Caprifoliaceae, but was reclassified as Adoxaceae due to genetic and morphological comparisons to plants in the genus Adoxa. The oppositely arranged leaves are pinnate with 5–9 leaflets (or, rarely, 3 or 11). Each leaf is 5–30 cm (2.0–11.8 in) long, and the leaflets have serrated margins. They bare large clusters of small white or cream-colored flowers in late spring; these are followed by clusters of small black, blue-black, or red berries (rarely yellow or white).

Elderberries are the fruit of the Sambucus tree. The most common type is the Sambucus nigra. The tree has clusters of small white or cream elderflowers and bunches of small blue or black elderberries.

Elderberry refers to several different varieties of the Sambucus tree, which is a flowering plant belonging to the Adoxaceae family.

The most common type is Sambucus nigra, also known as the European elderberry or black elder. This tree is native to Europe, though it is widely grown in many other parts of the world as well.

S. nigra grows up to 30 feet (9 meters) tall and has clusters of small white- or cream-colored flowers known as elderflowers. The berries are found in small black or blue-black bunches.

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The berries are quite tart and need to be cooked to be eaten. The flowers have a delicate muscat aroma and can be eaten raw or cooked.

Other varieties include the American elder, dwarf elder, blue elderberry, danewort, red-fruited elder and antelope brush.

Various parts of the elderberry tree have been used throughout history for medicinal and culinary purposes.

Historically, the flowers and leaves have been used for pain relief, swelling, inflammation, to stimulate the production of urine and to induce sweating. The bark was used as a diuretic, laxative and to induce vomiting.

In folk medicine, the dried berries or juice are used to treat influenza, infections, sciatica, headaches, dental pain, heart pain and nerve pain, as well as a laxative and diuretic.

Additionally, the berries can be cooked and used to make juice, jams, chutneys, pies and elderberry wine. The flowers are often boiled with sugar to make a sweet syrup or infused into tea. They can also be eaten fresh in salads.

Elderberry refers to several different varieties of the Sambucus tree, which is a flowering plant belonging to the Adoxaceae family.

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The most common type is Sambucus nigra, also known as the European elderberry or black elder. This tree is native to Europe, though it is widely grown in many other parts of the world as well.

S. nigra grows up to 30 feet (9 meters) tall and has clusters of small white- or cream-colored flowers known as elderflowers. The berries are found in small black or blue-black bunches.

The berries are quite tart and need to be cooked to be eaten. The flowers have a delicate muscat aroma and can be eaten raw or cooked.

Other varieties include the American elder, dwarf elder, blue elderberry, danewort, red-fruited elder and antelope brush.

Various parts of the elderberry tree have been used throughout history for medicinal and culinary purposes.

Historically, the flowers and leaves have been used for pain relief, swelling, inflammation, to stimulate the production of urine and to induce sweating. The bark was used as a diuretic, laxative and to induce vomiting.

In folk medicine, the dried berries or juice are used to treat influenza, infections, sciatica, headaches, dental pain, heart pain and nerve pain, as well as a laxative and diuretic.

Additionally, the berries can be cooked and used to make juice, jams, chutneys, pies and elderberry wine. The flowers are often boiled with sugar to make a sweet syrup or infused into tea. They can also be eaten fresh in salads.

In the summer, around late August or early September, the ditches in Nebraska are filled with dark, black, and purple berries.

These clusters of tiny fruits soon get eaten up by the birds. But before then, I grab as many as I can for baking, making tinctures, and drying into powders.

What are these in-demand beauties? They are a variety of elderberry (Sambucus canadensis), a plant that is native to many areas in the US, and that is becoming increasingly popular as an intentional addition to lawns and gardens.

The elderberry has so many amazing uses, and I’m excited to see it making a comeback!

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Elderberries are considered minor fruits, in comparison to blueberries, raspberries and blackberries. Although raw blue and purple elderberries are bitter and unpleasant tasting if eaten raw, and contain alkaloids that may cause nausea, they can be cooked or processed to make jams, jellies, wine, pies, flavored vinegars and teas.

Many gardeners simply use elderberries as ornamentals. These members of the honeysuckle family are easy to grow as attractive shrubs or small trees. Their blooms appear from early to mid-summer, and develop into reddish-purple to black berries that often attract hungry birds. (If you want the berries for yourself, use netting to protect your plants.)

Elderberries prefer moist, well-drained soil with a pH of 5.5 to 6.5, but these adaptable plants can perform in many types of soils. Give them full to part sun. Add good organic matter to the hole when you plant, and feed with 10-10-10 fertilize or compost each year in early spring.

Because their roots grow close to the soil’s surface, elderberries should be watered deeply and thoroughly the first year after planting. Mulch to control weeds, or pull them by hand, to avoid injuring or disturbing the shallow roots.

Elderberries are seldom bothered by pests or diseases, although powdery mildew may be a problem in wet weather. It’s not usually serious enough to kill the plants, but it can be treated with a fungicide, or you can simply remove and destroy the affected leaves in autumn. If cane borers infest old canes, prune out and destroy those canes.

Each year, elderberries sprout new canes that develop lateral branches. Second-year canes with lateral branches are usually the most fruitful. After three or four years, the old canes become less productive and can be pruned away. Wait until the plants are dormant in winter before pruning.

If you’ve noticed elderberries growing along riverbanks and roadsides, or in moist woodlands and marshes, you’ve probably seen the American elderberry, Sambucus canadensis, a common, wild species native to the U.S. Another common type, the European elderberry, Sambucus nigra, is native to Europe and Asia; it’s usually hardy in zones 5 to 7.

‘Black Lace’ is a deciduous elderberry for part to full sun that bears soft pink flower clusters in the spring and black-red berries in fall. The dark, purple-black foliage is finely cut, like a Japanese maple’s.

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A new introduction, ‘Black Beauty’ opens large pink flowers in mid-summer and grows up to 12 feet high. Both ‘Black Lace’ and ‘Black Beauty’ are deciduous plants that are hardy from zones 4a to 7b. Use them in containers, as specimens, or as hedges and screens. Pet owners, take note: the leaves, roots, bark and buds of both varieties can be toxic. 

If you want to grow elderberries for their fruits, plant at least two different varieties that are known to bear safe, edible berries. Keep the plants no more than 60 feet apart. Berries may take 2 to 3 years to appear. Look for varieties such as ‘John’s’, ‘Adams’, ‘Nova’ or ‘York’, which are all good producers. Berries are ready to harvest from August to September, depending on the cultivar you’re growing. Keep the fruits refrigerated until you’re ready to use them, and again, remember the blue and purple berries must be cooked to bring out a sweet flavor. Red elderberries are toxic.

Each bottle of Elderberry Juice contains powerful amounts of antioxidants, vitamins A, C, B-6, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folate, calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, and copper.

Elderberries are known for boosting the immune support system and helping in flu prevention and recovery.

Elderberry is also a known diuretic and is very effective at promoting regularity.

Our 100% pure elderberry juice has no added water and should be diluted by mixing 1/2 ounce of pure elderberry juice with 8 ounces of your favorite beverage.

Are you looking for bulk natural Elderberry products? Please click below.

Bulk Elderberry Juice Concentrate

Bulk NFC Elderberry Juice

Bulk Elderberry Powder


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